Category Archives: Superhero movie

Captain Marvel vs. The League of Evil Whining Man-babies– oh, and a review

Wherein there are minor spoilers.  Really, I don’t know how you can do it otherwise….

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In the toxic fever-swamp that is sci-fi/comic book fandom these days, it only takes one innocent remark to set off a tsunami of stupid.  So it was with Brie Larson, star of Captain Marvel, when she expressed a wish for more diversity in movie reviews.  This rather innocuous remark triggered a host of crying man-babies, mostly from the right of fandom, talking about how Larson was against men and how the film should be boycotted and how it was going to tank at the box-office and take the MCU and Marvel and Disney and maybe the planet with it.  To a large extent these are the same trolls that then intentionally set out to sabotage the Rotten Tomatoes ratings for the film as a way to poison the well, long before any of them had ever seen the movie.

Ha, ha, ha.

Even with an anticipated drop-off for the second weekend, Captain Marvel should easily make its money back in the very near future, considering that, as of today, Box Office Mojo shows it with a world-wide total earnings of about $550 million.   So much for that.

The sad thing is that this sort of whining political stupidity has become something of the new normal in fandom.  Between the Sad Puppies and Gamergate and the wholly unhinged reaction in some quarters to the The Last Jedi, blah, blah, blah, fans who just want to connect with good, enjoyable content have to negotiate a festering landscape populated by entirely unreasonable trolls who see left-wing, anti-man conspiracies everywhere.  These goombahs, of course, are merely a specific thread of the greater alt-right narrative distorting our public discourse and popular culture at the moment.  You wish you could just ignore them, but that’s rather like trying to ignore someone flicking a cigarette lighter in a room filled with flammable gas.  At some point you need to yell, “Knock it off!”, if only for your personal survival.

Whew– enough of that.  I would like to say a few words about the movie itself.  Somewhat at the risk of setting off more swamp-gas flares, but you can’t let the trolls silence you, either.

So, the 4-1-1, the bottom line, the skinny– Captain Marvel is a good movie.  Not a great movie, not Infinity War, or War and Peace, or Citizen Kane.  It’s a good, mid-rank Marvel movie that accomplishes the main thing it sets out to do– establish the character of Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel and help us understand why she’s going to be very, very important in Avengers: End Game  (yeah, new trailer, yippee! Ahem.).

It does so by starting out pretty much in media res, with Carol (called ‘Vers’) already on the Kree homeworld of Hala, already a part of the the Kree Starforce, but troubled by dreams of a possible former life she doesn’t remember.  From there she ends up the captive of a group of Skrulls, perpetual enemies of the Kree, and is taken to Earth, where she attempts to track down the Skrull infiltrators, while connecting with early editions of Nick Fury and Shield, who help her begin to piece together her past.  This leads her to a rather startling discovery that causes her to question what she has been told, and who she can trust.

On the whole, this story line works, but the first time I saw the film I thought its first half was off in terms of tone.  Danvers is not nearly as much a fish out of water on the primitive Earth of 1995 as I thought she should have been, and her relationship with Fury is a little too easygoing for a pair of people, one of whom is a spy and the other an ‘alien’ warrior, who have just met.  I was a little concerned that the movie wasn’t going to fulfill the minimum necessary requirements to make Carol the hero she needs to be for the final confrontation with Thanos in End Game.

But then there came a rather nifty mid-film twist, Carol gets her lost history filled in, and she realizes that she has been lied to and manipulated for the six years she has been gone from Earth.  This sets up a really satisfying climactic confrontation  in which Carol realizes her full power, and makes her the hero she needs to be.  By the way, do not skip out on the mid and post-credit scenes.  The mid-credit snippet is almost worth the price of admission by itself.

So, a slow start, but the film picks up and finishes pretty strong.  It doesn’t hit every note I would have preferred, and I would have handled the first half differently, but they aren’t paying little old (emphasis on the ‘old’) me to direct these films.  Which is, admittedly, probably a good thing.  Captain Marvel is not Infinity War, but neither is it Thor: The Dark World.  Which I still liked, but it did have issues.  Not all MCU movies are created equal, and I’m just fine with that.

There is one aspect of the film, however, that positively disappointed me– the way Fury loses his eye.  Lame.  Sorry, I was expecting more.

But, on the whole, go see the film.  It’s good, and it’s really about as solid a prologue for End Game as we could hope for.  I am really looking forward to seeing Brie Larson as Captain Marvel in that film, in ensemble with all the other great characters of the MCU, as they bring this story line to a thundering conclusion.  We live in glorious times, despite the trolls.

Later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Okay, I gotta do this– a quick and dirty review of “Spider-man: Into the Spider-verse”

 

Good film, see it.

Okay, maybe not that quick and dirty.  But first, as always….

***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS

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Okay, full disclosure– as a Marvel fan(atic) I am embarrassed to admit that this film wasn’t really even on my radar until about two weeks ago, when I finally noticed the trailer on YouTube.  I vaguely remember hearing something about it back when, but I don’t pay attention to a lot of animation these days because so much of it is dreadful.  The upshot is that I was trundling along, mostly minding my own misery, in what I thought was the gray wasteland between Infinity War and Captain Marvel, when suddenly, boom!, this trailer smacks me right between the eyes– and suddenly the wasteland looked a little less gray.

Okay, a lot less.

Another disclosure– I have not kept up very well with the ever-expanding Marvel comic book multiverse in recent years.  In fact, the only comic I have purchased with regularity since about 2000 has been Rat Queens, and even that has tailed off lately.  I was vaguely aware of Miles Morales as an alternate Spider-man, but I was totally unaware that Gwen Stacy had been given her own turn as Spider-woman, and the idea caught me by surprise and thrilled me to death.  Yeah, I’m one of those romantic cupcakes who never got over Gwen’s death in the comic book, blah, blah, blah, so sue me.  It’s enough to say that the moment I saw the trailer, quite aside from all the other fascinating tidbits it offered, I was instantly on-board and ready to investigate this movie.

And, boy, am I glad I did.  Basically Miles Morales’ origin story as Spider-man in his reality, the movie also manages to weld together other Spideys from other realities into a coherent story about loss, friendship, love and becoming who you need to become, all in the face of a villain (a version of Kingpin far removed from Vincent D’Onofrio’s portrayal of the character in Netflix’s Daredevil) who is maniacal, but possessed of an understandable, if misguided, motivation.  I often feel animated films skimp characterization, but this time, nope.  This movie is chiefly about character, and it is so very well written that I don’t think I detected a false note anywhere.

At the same time, on another level, it leaves me flummoxed.  How can one film be so serious and silly at the same time, often with the same characters in the same scene?  I mean, it has a cartoon (think Looney Tunes) Spidey pig hitting villains over the head with a giant mallet, and not only does it work in the midst of a completely intense battle, people in the theater I was in cheered.  Somehow the writers  (Phil Lord and Rodney Rothman) manage to blend pathos, off-the-wall humor, asides that very nearly break the fourth wall, intense struggle and loss and battles in which it is not at all clear all the good guys are going to survive, into a seamless whole in which the contrasting tones not only do not jar us out of our suspension of disbelief, they reinforce and invigorate each other.  It leaves me scratching my head.  I don’t know how they did it, but I like it.

Part of that off-the-wall/serious hybridization is the sheer look of the movie, which is bright, highly-colored, sharp and full of elements drawn directly from comic-books, such as little (or not so little) internal dialogue balloons, which might have seemed pretentious, or flat-out stupid, in other hands, but which work here.  I usually prefer my movies straight-forward and realistic, even my animation, but somehow this time around the comic-book elements worked.  Again, it is a mystery to me how, but I’m just going to go with it.

Other online reviewers have already pointed out that Spider-verse accomplishes what Justice League could not do last year– kick-start a superhero franchise in one fell swoop, and I won’t belabor a point that’s not original with me.  More incisive observers than I will have to parse out why one super-hero kick-start works, and another doesn’t.  All I know is, me like Spider-verseJustice League, ugh.

And now, in no particular order, some random notes–

  1. One of the big reveals in the movie, not at all hinted at in the trailer, was this universe’s Doc Ock, who is a woman, Dr. Oliva Octavius.  Her gender does nothing to reduce her menace.
  2. Having said that, I’m worried that I find this Doc Ock kinda, well, hot.  I guess I like intellectual women…?
  3. I like this universe’s Aunt May, too, although not for the same reasons.  All-too-often the Aunt May of the comic-books was Peter’s supportive mother figure.  This Aunt May is that, but a damn sight more, too.
  4. When Gwen Stacy is on the screen I can’t take my eyes off her.  Not because the character is pretty (although she is– and, no, I’m not being creepy), but because I get pretty badly verklempt about Gwen most days (Emma Stone in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, by the way, broke my heart all over again), and so I can’t get enough of a Gwen Stacy who is alive and kicking ass.  I will stand in line for her movie, if and when it comes out.  And I don’t think I’m the only one.
  5. The only downside of this film for me is perhaps the fact that I have now had the theme song of the original animated series stuck in my head for five days.  Ow….
  6. I mentioned that all the characters are well-drawn, but Miles, of course, takes center-stage, and I have hand out kudos again to the writers who crafted a kid who is utterly believable as a particular kid, with all the usual kid worries, suddenly caught up in things that grown men and women would have trouble dealing with.  This, of course, has been the whole theme of Spider-man since its inception, and Lord and Rothman’s take on it is excellent.

I don’t think I’m going to say much more, although there are things I haven’t revealed about the story, despite my spoiler warnings.  I will sum up by saying that I am pleased to discover, in an age of over-hype and media campaigns that would put the planning for D-Day to shame, we can still be surprised by a film that comes out of nowhere and knocks us on our butts.  And, yeah, the wait for Captain Marvel and Avengers: End Game is now just a little more tolerable.

See this movie.

‘Nuff said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avengers: Infinity War– wild-eyed and totally wacky speculations on what happens next– SPOILERS!!

Okay, just in case the title of this post didn’t get through to you–

SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***

If there is anyone who has still not seen Avengers: Infinity War and wants to remain unspoiled, STOP READING NOW!!!

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Okay, for here on out it’s your own fault if you get spoiled.  Totally.

So, massive numbers of people have seen the film, and a significant subset of those are freaked out by the ending– about how the good guys lost, how Thanos won, how could they kill off so many characters, on and on.  Come on, guys, what did you think was going to happen?

Despite certain claims to the contrary, I totally disbelieve the idea that Avengers 4 is going to be a “completely different” film.  The Russos are very good story-tellers and they laid a cunning trap for us.  Infinity War is, in truth, Part One of a two-part epic.  As such, it ended exactly as it should have— with the heroes at their uttermost lowest point, defeated, on their backs, not knowing what to do next.  The story required it.  Anything else would have been tantamount to cheating, or, worse, cowardice as story-tellers.  I don’t think you can accuse the Russos of cowardice.  The stunned, weeping fans stumbling out of movie theaters around the world are evidence to the contrary.

Okay, so how do the good guys claw their way out of this hole?  The original comic is no sure guide to where the Russos intend to go.  But there are clues in the movie.  What follows is pure speculation based on my viewing of the film.  I could be way, way off-base, but I think there are points of light in the darkness.

First, Dr. Strange saw 14-million-plus possible futures, out of which there was only one– one— in which the good guys win.  From the moment he ran through those futures, he had to be working overtime to set that one possibility up.  This is the context in which everything that came after has to be understood.

While on the way to Thanos’ homeworld of Titan, Dr. Strange explicitly tells Tony that Strange would let Tony and Peter Parker both die before he gave up the Time Stone.  At the critical point of the battle with Thanos, however, when Tony has been stabbed and appears to be dying, Strange suddenly reverses course and hands the Time Stone over, ostensibly in exchange for Tony’s life.

Most people commenting on this assume that means that Tony Stark is critical to ultimate victory for the good guys, and I would not argue with that.  After Thanos’ departure with the Time Stone, Tony asks Strange “why”.  Strange effectively answers the question in two parts.  He first tells Tony that they are “in the end-game now”.  Then, just before he dissolves, he tells Stark that “this is the only way this could have played out.”  In other words, the one path to victory is in place.  It remains to be seen if the surviving heroes can walk it.

Well and good.  But I think there’s more to that scene than meets the eye.  Watching Strange as he surrenders the Time Stone, the way the scene is cut, and the looks Strange gives Thanos, suggest to me that Strange has jiggered the Time Stone with a hidden spell.  There may be some sort of temporal time-bomb ticking away in it.  Its exact nature, I can’t guess, but I suspect Thanos will not like it.

Another moment in the fight on Titan was also suggestive of something bigger.  At one point Tony manages to scratch Thanos, who laughs it off by saying something to the effect, “All that effort for one drop of blood?”

Hmm.  The very fact that the film calls out what would otherwise be a insignificant injury suggests to me that Tony Stark, armed with one drop of Thanos’ blood, may be a formidable foe, indeed.  A drop of blood means that Tony now has Thanos’ DNA– and Bruce Banner, world-renown biochemist (along with all his other degrees) yet lives. Tailored bio-weapon, anyone?

Finally, there’s Captain Marvel.  The sight of her emblem was the one thing that seemed to lift people’s spirits in the showings I attended.  Some have compared her to Superman, and, by the rood, we could use a little of that OP sledgehammeriness right now.  Or a lot.  Lots and lots.  Seeing Captain Marvel open a really big can of whup-ass on Thanos will probably make my year.

How this all plays out in Avengers 4 is anybody’s guess.  We won’t have a clue until we see a trailer– hell, at the moment I would settle for the movie’s fracking title— except that there will surely be intense battles, further losses, and probably a bittersweet ending.  It would another kind of cheat if the good guys won, and dialed everything back to exactly as it was before Thanos attacked the Asgardian refugee ship.  The lesson of Infinity War seems to be that, when confronting ultimate evil, losses are inevitable.  It may be that some of the surviving heroes will pay the ultimate price, even as they– possibly– rescue some of those who were lost.  We’ll just have to see.

It’s going to be a long year…..

 

 

 

 

 

Another reaction to Avengers: Infinity War– but with SPOILERS!! YEE-HAW!!

Because I am the obsessive fan-boy that I am, I just had to go see Avengers: Infinity War again this evening.  That’s twice in twenty-four hours, children, and it may end up being three times in forty-eight hours, assuming that tomorrow I can do my morning exercise, pay my rent and do my laundry in a timely manner– you know, all the real-life check-off items that exist merely to allow nut-jobs like me to spend inordinate amounts of money and time re-watching Marvel movies.  What was once merely entertainment is now a way of life.  I am nerd, hear me roar.

(On the other hand, I wonder if seeing the same movie over and over again in a short amount of time is like doing too many wormhole jumps at once?  Hmm.  I’ll let you know, assuming my eyeballs don’t fall out)

Suffice to say, I enjoyed the movie even more the second time around, in part because I was prepared for the repartee going past at Warp Six.  I caught more nuances (especially one that is the core of this post– more about that in a minute), and the audience tonight was especially receptive and engaged.  Also, I didn’t have a distraction this time around that detracted a bit from my first viewing, i.e., tonight’s show was not 3-D.  I didn’t mention it in my post last night, but the 3-D yesterday, for some reason, seemed kinda muddy and dark.  Maybe it was my aging eyes, maybe it was the glasses.  All I know is that I liked the regular format better.

Now, about that nuance I mentioned–

SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***

Proceed no further if you don’t want to know some details about the film.  There, I have said it.  Don’t blame me if you keep reading and have your illusions shattered.

 

 

Okay, late in the film, Thanos has kicked everyone’s butt who came against him on his own ruined homeworld of Titan– Iron Man, Spider-man, Nebula, Drax, Mantis, Peter Quill/Starlord.  He has stabbed Tony right through his advanced armor and it looks like curtains for our playboy/philanthropist/genius (probably didn’t get the order right, but you get the point).  Dr. Strange, injured and collapsed nearby, tells Thanos he will surrender the Eye of Agamotto (aka, the Stone of Time) if Thanos will spare Tony.

Two critical points here– this well after the point in the film where Strange tells Tony that he, Strange, would let Tony and Peter Parker (Spider-man) both die before he would give up the Time Stone.  It is also after Strange, using the Time Stone, has examined 14 million-plus possible futures and found only one in which the Avengers were able to defeat Thanos.  That’s the setup.

(By the way, Tony and Strange do not like each other.  It’s almost worth the price of admission just to hear Strange call Tony a “douche-bag”.  Oh, yeah….)

Then Strange, strangely, reverses course and hands over the Time Stone to Thanos, ostensibly to save Iron Man’s life.  When Tony asks him why he did it, Strange says something to the effect that “this is the only way it could play out”, right before he dissolves (yes, Thanos wins the battle to reset the universe.  That’s part of why the cliffhanger ending is such a pisser).

Uh-huh.  I had funny feeling last night about Strange surrendering the Time Stone so meekly, and tonight I paid particularly close attention to Strange’s expression as Thanos takes the Time Stone.  By doing so I think I caught a piece of subtle business, about on the same level as the look Obi-Wan gives Han Solo when Han makes his ‘parsecs’ crack in Star Wars.  Strange is particularly intent as Thanos takes the Time Stone and puts it into his gauntlet– as if he wanted to make sure Thanos took it and added it to the gauntlet’s array of stones.

Bingo.  I am certain that Doctor Strange, that tricksy smarty-pants, has put some sort of mystical whammy on the Time Stone.  One that Thanos is not going to like.  At all.  One that is going to tick away like a time-bomb and play a big part in the Avengers’ ultimate victory.

The thought makes me grin maniacally and rub my hands in glee.  It makes the cliffhanger easier to deal with.  It is the sort of smart plotting that has made these movies, in general, a joy to watch (okay, not all equally.  Can you people just get over hating The Dark World, please?).

Last night I begged the movie’s producers to speed up the release of the next Avengers film.  I know, realistically, that’s not going to happen, if only because the next film is undoubtedly tied to the release of the Captain Marvel movie (oh, and there’s a sweet tidbit teasing that flick in Infinity War, too).  But I am a-quiver with anticipation.  The next year’s going to pass sooo slowly….

Meanwhile, the only solution is to go see Infinity War again.  I’ll just try not to cackle when Strange hands over the Time Stone.  You’re riding high now, Thanos, but just you wait, bitch– you are going down.

Later.

 

 

 

An immediate reaction to “Avengers: Infinity War”– assuming I can form complete sentences….

This is not a review of Avengers: Infinity Warwhich I just saw on an early showing.  It is more of a quick and emotionally-laden reaction, with just a few observations on a few points in the movie.  Above all, in opposition to my usual habit, I am going to avoid any spoilers, as it would almost certainly make me the subject of mob violence.

Okay, here  we go–

Holy shit.

Holy wild-jungle-spawned bouncing off the wall pull the eject cord and tumble end-over-end through an exploding volcano shit.  With sprinkles on top.

Character deaths.  In the first five minutes.  Before the freaking opening credits.  OMG….

Lots of repartee, much of which goes by really fast, which demands a second viewing, assuming I can find a spare ticket for this movie over the weekend in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area.  Frankly, not quite all of it worked– a couple of scenes between the Guardians of the Galaxy and Thor (that’s no spoiler, their meeting was in the trailers) were a little weak, in my opinion.  But those were minor blips in this tsunami of a movie.

Speaking of trailers, be aware that there was a lot of stuff in the trailers that was not in the movie, and some of the stuff that was didn’t play out quite the same way.  It’s all part of Marvel’s master-plan to keep the fans guessing.

Note:  there is no mid-credits scene, but there is a comparatively long one at the end, and you want to wait for it.  Definitely.  For sure.  I’m not joking.

Huge cliffhanger at the end.  Freaking huge.  If the cliffhanger at the end of The Empire Strikes Back was Mount St. Helens, then this one is fracking Mount Tambora, the reason 1816 was known as the “year without a summer”.  You are warned.

Precisely because of that cliffhanger, they cannot get the next Avengers movie into theaters soon enough.  All we know at the moment is that it is due to be released sometime next year.  We don’t even know the title.  Marvel and Disney, you cruel bastards, make the next movie a Christmas release.  You can do it….

I don’t think there was a weak performance by anyone in this picture, although some of the mid-rank characters go by pretty quick.  Somehow the filmmakers pretty much pulled off the feat of giving all the main characters enough to do so that none of them are slighted, which was something I was seriously worried about.  It’s doubly impressive that the action takes place in several locations at once, and even more impressive that they still found time give Thanos some depth and feeling– not like another super-villain I could name from a certain recent movie.  Yech.  Really, there is no comparison.

Be prepared for a movie that moves really fast, and bounces between a lot of different locales.  Personally I didn’t find the pace too hard to keep up with, but you definitely don’t want to go out for popcorn during the middle of the picture.  Very bad idea.

See this movie, but hold on tight and brace yourself for that cliffhanger.  Anybody who expects this movie to end tied up with a neat little ribbon is delusional.  But it is a tremendous setup for the next film.

Christmas, you guys!!

 

Justice League- a review. Sort of.

SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***SPOILERS***

Really, if you haven’t seen the movie, don’t even go one word further if you want to remain unspoiled.  My usual review style is to talk about plot points in details, and this will be no exception.

So– Justice League — I’d almost say you’d have to have been living under a rock for the last year to not know about this film, but it does occur to me that superhero films are just not on some people’s radar, so the quickest of recaps– Justice League is DC’s latest entry in their Extended Cinematic Universe, their attempt to catch up with the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  League is the fifth film in the series, recounting the origin of the team uniting Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Cyborg, the Flash and Aquaman.  Ok, ’nuff said.

In the run up to the film’s debut critical opinion began to be increasingly negative.  Just before it opened, Rotten Tomatoes came out with a rating of 40%, a dismal consensus.  Some reviewers said positive things about the movie, but many more were negative and deprecatory.  Suffice to say that I had very low expectations going into the theater yesterday.

On the whole, however, I am pleased to report that on the whole the movie is not quite the absolute disaster that 40% rating would lead you to believe.  It is not a great film; it is a film with issues; but it is not the muddled shit-pile of Suicide Squad or the even more muddled Batman v. Superman.  On some levels it was pretty good, while on others it leaves you scratching your head wondering why the hell did they do that?, and on yet others feeling like they should just get on with it.

First, the pros–

  1. Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman/Diana Prince.  I wish they had just come out with the next Wonder Woman movie.  Gadot commands the screen in any scene she’s in; at her first appearance in League, where she foils a bombing by right-wing fanatics (led, in a dangerous bit of typecasting, by Roose Bolton), my impulse was to stand up and cheer.  My admiration goes beyond the fact that she is stunningly beautiful; Gadot gets the character, and brings her to life.
  2. Ezra Miller as the Flash.  He brings a fresh approach to the character, as a nerdy youngster none to sure of his own capabilities, with fears to overcome and enough pain in his own history on which to lay the foundations of a hero.
  3. Jeremy Irons as Alfred.  He’s not on screen much, but when he is brings dry wit to some otherwise rather absurd goings-on.

Well, that was over quick.  Now, the cons–

  1. Jason Momoa is irritating as Aquaman/Arthur Curry.  His underwater biker routine gets tiresome real quick.
  2. Someone else has said that Ben Affleck (Batman) looks as if he would like to be somewhere other than in this film, and that seems a fair assessment.  He gives perhaps the flattest performance of the ensemble.
  3. Yeah, I know, the villain was named “Steppenwolf” in the comic, but for someone of my generation the name really conjures up a way different image.  Threw me out of the picture every time.
  4. Not only that, but Steppenwolf is just not that threatening a villain.  Not sure what it is, but we have had a glut lately of villains with horns (Thor: Ragnarok, Wonder Woman, etc.), so maybe the headgear was too cliche (?).  Whatever the reason, I didn’t get a sense of visceral danger from the guy, despite how many Amazons and Atlanteans he smashes.
  5. On top of that, I thought this was supposed to be a build-up to a confrontation between the League and Darkseid, paralleling the coming confrontation between the Avengers and Thanos in the MCU.  As best I can recall, however, Steppenwolf makes one passing reference to Darkseid, and then, nothing.  This is one area where I still had expectations to be disappointed.
  6. I miss Hal Jordan.  Maybe they just couldn’t squeeze him into the ensemble this time around.
  7. For the most part, the action sequences are kinda, well, meh.  Formulaic maybe too generous.  Once or twice, I had the sense that I was watching a Michael Bay film.  That’s so not a good thing.
  8. Superman’s resurrection sequence is, well, creepy, a quality that was even called out by the Flash in the film itself.
  9. Clark’s reunion with Lois Lane is half sweet and half schmaltz, and I’m not entirely which is which in the scene.  Plus, after he flies her to Smallville for private time, where did they get his clothes?  Ma Kent had moved out and everything….
  10. Oh, and while you’re resurrecting Clark, you leave the mother box that resurrected him, and which the villain has been frantically seeking, out in the open where he can grab it? That’s one for CinemaSins.

If I were to sum up the negative aspects of the film, I’d say that League is a film with far too many color-by-the-numbers elements, some uninspired or even repulsive performances, and which is dragged down even further by the fact that its basic premises were established for it by Batman v. Superman.  It has to try to reconcile some really dumb and incoherent plot points that BvS perpetrated, chief among which, in my opinion, was killing off Superman so early in the franchise.  To League’s credit, it almost pulls it off here and there, but then it commits its own acts of incoherence (e.g., see # 10 above).  It feels as if the people who created the overall story arc really, really didn’t think everything through beforehand and are now stuck in various thematic corners.  And, while I have a high tolerance for grim and gritty, the way the DC films have been going about it just drags your soul down and leaves you gasping for some Guardians of the Galaxy humor.

On the whole, I give League a middling, 2.5 out of 5 Mother Boxes rating.  Considering that I would give BvS one and Suicide Squad one and a half, that’s some improvement, but not much.  It would be nice if the guys running the DCECU could have an opportunity to really, really rethink their approach to their material, but by now, five films in, with more in the pipeline, it’s probably too late.

Well, in any case, here’s to the next Wonder Woman film.  We have to wait until November, 2019, though.  A reason to live.

Later.