The blues monster, Part II, or dang you, J.D. Salinger

In my last post I mentioned that real-life has been pulling me away from Princess of Fire. Well, real-life has now doubled down on me– under considerable pressure from the spousal unit, I have started working on our taxes, in the hopes of getting our tax refund back in a timely fashion. I understand the logic, since we need every dollar right now, but I really despise doing my taxes every year. Really, really despise it.

On top of that, I woke this morning in a funk, the first real one I’ve had since publishing Princess of Shadows, mostly around my continued unemployment. I spent a good portion of my morning walk thinking up new acronyms for myself (I’m either a Person of Worklessness- POW– or an ILL– Individual Lacking Labor).

Between the funk and the taxes the most productive thing I did today was take a nap. Progress on Fire is slowing. I anticipated it would. Hopefully this is just a temporary lull.

Unless, of course, I give up writing entirely. I watched part of the documentary on J. D. Salinger last night on PBS, and I discovered that there is nothing better than J. D. Salinger to give a person an instant literary inferiority complex.

I didn’t get to see the whole documentary, as it ran way past my bed time, but ’tis enough, ’twill serve. I look at Salinger and I know I’ll never be in that class of writer. I try to console myself that I am writing genre, but I will never be Heinlein or Martin, either. Grrr.

But, of course, I won’t give up writing. I’d have to shut off my brain to do that. I will just have to keep plodding on, doing my best. Maybe someday I’ll actually be good.

But that’s after I get the taxes done.

Later.

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5 thoughts on “The blues monster, Part II, or dang you, J.D. Salinger”

  1. Don’t ever give up. Remember, too, that the “Greats” lived in another time – the publishing industry is not what it was and has been ailing for a long time. Now days, they don’t give a new writer time to establish themselves, they shuffle books off the shelf as quickly as they put them on. Nor do they tolerate anything “outside the box.”

    These are hard times for any writer (I’m not making a living at it either and I have two books published with a third on the way), but there is real talent out there as good as any that has gone before. We might not be there – or we might – but whether the world ever recognizes it or not, that part of you has to express itself.

    But then, you know that already. Someone once described writing as a disease. I think they were right.

    Cheers, mate, and good luck with the taxes. 🙂

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